Quick Reference to Psychotropic Medications

Developed by John Preston, Psy.D., ABPP. Especially nifty for patient education. I would like to turn this chart into a visual some day… Still wondering how I will do that, though… haha.

It’s Official!

As of May 8th, I have officially graduated from my hospital’s new graduate residency program. It was a year-long (well, more than a year long) program that involved a 3-month preceptorship, two weeks of orientation, monthly seminars, and presentations of evidence-based quality improvement projects at the end of the program.

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It’s weird to think that I’m not a “new grad" anymore. And it’s a bit scary. Obviously there’s more that I’m responsible and accountable for since I’m no longer the "new kid" on the block. Roles have changed. People ask me more questions. I find myself teaching others more often. I find myself having more of a routine, but of course there are still things I struggle with.

IdleDancer: Nursing: Some Common Assumptions about RN's

idledancer:

1. That all nurses will have each other’s backs

2. That female nurses aren’t nearly as strong as male nurses

3. That you work less hours than anybody else, just because you do the 12 hr shifts

4. That nurses are not as intelligent as doctors

5. When you finally find five minutes to…

IdleDancer: Nursing: Following a Super Organized Nurse

idledancer:

A small sigh of relief when you take over….Exceptions of course for patients in distress, and for those nurses who are just superbly organized in a controlled chaos sort of way.

1. There are no completely empty IV bags when you take over

2. There’s actually a second bag of fluids up. In…

Inner Strength & Life Lessons

I haven’t blogged in a long time. After a certain point of working night shifts for a while, all I’ve been wanting to do on my days off is sleep, relax (in other words, do nothing), and rejuvenate my soul for the next shift. It’s been a somewhat exhausting experience, but I’ve come to learn a lot about myself in the process.

Nursing can push you to your limits. School was tough, but the actual job is a lot tougher. Fatigue, exhaustion, anxiety, apprehension have been consuming me. I’ve learned more than ever that it is important to stand up for what you believe in, but to also have an open mind. 

Second thing on my mind is this: Negativity is a whirlpool of victimization and lack of productivity. It’s a way to trap yourself from going on to achieving your goals. And I was caught in that whirlpool. For quite a while. There are many things that are beyond your control in the workplace…but your mindset and outlook on the situation can make all the difference

Looking forward to blogging again (and more consistently) and rekindling that nursing spirit in me!

"Liar. Hypochondriac. Attention-seeker. Crazy."

"Liar. Hypochondriac. Attention-seeker. Crazy."

Senior Texting Code
Saw some of these hanging on the wall at work (geriatric psychiatry unit). Couldn’t help but laugh while reading these! ROFLCGU.
Image from: http://bitsandpieces.us/2011/08/15/senior-texting-code/

Senior Texting Code

Saw some of these hanging on the wall at work (geriatric psychiatry unit). Couldn’t help but laugh while reading these! ROFLCGU.


Image from: http://bitsandpieces.us/2011/08/15/senior-texting-code/

New Grad Job Interviews: What I’ve Learned

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A relative of mine recently asked me about nursing job interviews—the usual What to expect, what will the interviewers ask, what are they looking for in a candidate. She just graduated from nursing school and is eager to work.

I’ve worked for about a year now (February 27th will make it an “official” year). I have to say… my view of nursing (in terms of what managers are looking for in a candidate, what traits are important for the job, etc.) has changed dramatically.

"Understanding Behavioral Changes in Dementia"

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The Lewy Body Dementia Association is a nonprofit organization dedicated to increasing awareness of lewy body dementia, providing support to those affected by the disease, and promoting scientific research. LBDA created a thorough and educational guide (http://lbda.org/content/understanding-behavioral-changes-dementia) to help caregivers understand the behaviors of those affected by dementia and how to respond to and care for these behaviors.

This online guide is especially helpful for me as a nurse. I wish I could have read this before starting my job on the geriatric psychiatry unit. Understanding the reasoning behind behavioral changes and the disease process of dementia has enlightened me tremendously. You don’t look at a person and think about how “difficult” they are being; instead, you begin to critically think about “what” it is they need and “how” you can respond to it.